The Two Legged Project Arrives

Many of you readers will know that we’ve been eagerly/impatiently/nervously awaiting the arrival of our baby.

When the Beast from the East hit the UK at the beginning of March I was put under house arrest … just in case. But we crossed our fingers that we wouldn’t have a middle of the night rush to hospital in all the snow.

We didn’t. And I filled my time writing blog posts and scheduling them over the next couple of weeks.

Six days after the due date, with us both getting increasingly impatient, we welcomed the arrival of our little girl, Mallory Jill, who bounced into the world at 6.29am on Sunday 11th March.

It’s safe to say that I had my comeuppance for having the world’s most straightforward pregnancy with a long and painful labour. But everyone likes a good story don’t they! I won’t divulge the details for those of you of a sensitive nature.

Anyway, we’ve definitely got our hands full, as Mallory is already very alert, very hungry and not very sleepy!

I will be off work for a few weeks, so may well be lacking in blog inspiration, let alone time to write, as we find our feet as parents, so I’m afraid readers, the Rubber Curry Comb will be a bit quiet over the next few weeks. But don’t worry, there will be a Phoenix update when the saddler has been and I’ve ridden her! And of course some photos of when we introduce the horses to little Mallory.


White Line Disease

One of my client’s poor pony is suffering from white line disease. We think it’s been a long time brewing because each time the pony has been trimmed by the farrier he’s been footsore for a few days. Anyway, what seemed to be an abscess a couple of months ago didn’t clear up and then the vet diagnosed white line disease. A new farrier later, and he’s making progress. Unfortunately, due to the rate of growth in the hoof, any problems with the hoof wall takes months to recover.

I don’t know much about white line disease, so I’ve done some reading up on it. When you pick up the foot, you can see the white line where there sole meets the outer hoof wall. Damage to this area allows fungus and bacteria to get between the sole and hoof wall, which causes them to separate. Infection then spreads up the hoof towards the coronet band, destroying the hoof wall and making the horse very lame. White line disease usually affects the toe and quarters of the hoof. As the hoof deteriorates it takes on a chalky, crumbly, soft, white texture.

There are numerous different types of fungi which can be involved in white line disease, which makes treatment harder, especially as some spores cannot be eradicated, which means that some types of white line disease cannot he treated, only managed.

Because the hoof wall is made of dead cells, like our finger nails, the damaged area cannot regrow as skin would around a wound. Instead new, healthy hoof has to grow down from the coronet band which can take up to six months. Which is why you can see ridges on hoof walls following a change in diet or health.

White line disease sets in if the hoof wall is weakened, or if the hoof wall starts to separate from the laminae due to poor trimming and balancing of the foot. It begins with small cavities in the hoof wall, or seedy toe, which a good farrier should pick up on and take appropriate steps to prevent the disease spreading.

Farriers will shoe horses with white line disease with bevelled shoes to bring the breakover point further under the foot which takes the pressure off the toe area, and supports the compromised area. Shod horses are more likely to develop white line disease because of the mechanical pressure of the metal shoe against the hoof wall can literally tear the hoof wall away from the foot.

Treatment of white line disease involves removing the infected hoof wall, and then keeping the area as clean as possible. Horses usually need box rest, especially if lame, and to keep the foot as clean as possible, using an iodine or alternative solution. Once healing is established and the ground conditions are favourable – dry and mud free – the horse can begin light work because movement improves circulation and increase hoof growth.

There is a risk of laminitis developing as a secondary infection if a lot of the hoof wall is debrided and the bones of the hoof are less supposed so the laminae becomes detached. By supporting the bars and frog of the shoe you can reduce the risk of laminitis developing.

Caught early, white line disease is easily managed, but in more severe cases special shoes, boots or cast are needed for several months in order to provide enough support to the structure of the hoof while the healthy hoof grows down. Farriers measure the lesion upon treatment so that the next time they trim the foot they can establish if the rate of hoof growth is exceeding the tearing of the hoof wall. If this is the case then the hoof will recover as long as it’s kept free from further infection by keeping it disinfected, dry and open to the air to discourage the fungi from thriving.

You can try to prevent the onset of white line disease by feeding biotin containing supplements to improve the quality of the hoof wall, and having the hooves trimmed and well-balanced regularly. The farrier should keep an eye on old nail holes, old abscess sites and quarter cracks. Other than that, good hoof hygiene and care is paramount at preventing white line disease, and catching it early. Horses kept in a more artificial environment – stabled with less turnout – and those in extreme conditions (very wet or very arid) are often more prone to developing white line disease.



Equine Massage

One of my clients has recently started studying to be an equine masseuse. Not physiotherapy or osteopathy or anything, but straight forward muscle massage.

Firstly, what’s the benefit of having your horse massaged? Well, do you enjoy a massage? I would have thought the answer would be yes!

in short, a massage eases any post workout aches in the muscles, helps dissipate any lactic acid, can help ease anxiety related tension, improve circulation, help to move lymphatic fluid around the system, reduces stiffness and swelling after working hard, improves muscle tone, prevents adhesions and stretches connective tissue. As well as the fact that it is mentally relaxing.

A lot of owners, especially with competition horses, have regular visits from chiropractors and the like to ensure that there are no skeletal problems like a dropped pelvis, but I think the benefits of a general post work massage is often overlooked. I mean, if you’ve been to an event then the next day you usually give the horse off or a gentle walk and then the next couple of days is light hacking, so you appreciate the physical recovery time needed by the horse. But a general massage could enhance this recovery, or at least speed up the recovery time. If you think about it in human terms then after working in the garden on the first spring like day of the year nothing is better than a back massage from your other half … hint hint!

An article posted by my client last week made me realise that actually a massage would have benefits for horses for reasons I hadn’t thought of. We all know that horses have very sensitive skin as they can feel a fly land anywhere on their bodies. This has implications if you think about tack, and not in the obvious ways. Obviously a badly fitting tack puts pressure on the back muscles and creates muscle tension, leading to a change in the gait and stresses the rest of their body. But did you know that if a horse wears a fly veil then the pressure caused around the headpiece and browband can cause asymmetry in the knee joint movement? So a general massage in conjunction with tack fitting and tack improvement will reduce the tension in those pressure points, which will correct and improve other areas of the body, which we don’t automatically connect together. You can read her blog here.

So what are the other benefits of an equine massage? Let’s look more closely at the circulatory benefits to begin with. A massage increases circulation to all body parts, which increases the oxygen and nutrients taken in by cells and improves the functions of the cells. Which means better removal of waste products, including lactic acid and carbon dioxide. It means cells are more efficient so a horse will perform at a better level and be less prone to tying up and stiffness. The lymphatic system works in conjunction with the circulatory system, so the more efficient circulatory system will improve lymphatic drainage, so reducing the likelihood of legs becoming filled.

The benefit of massage which we’re all aware of, is the muscular benefits. Knots of muscle fibres are physically broken down and realigned, which means they can contract more efficiently so improving athletic performance. Straightened muscles are of a better quality so are less likely to tear, or put undue stress on surrounding connective tissue and joints. Additionally, these muscles will be more efficient as they aren’t working against their own resistance so the body will work more efficiently; using less energy to reach optimum performance.

In the same way that we feel relaxed and stress free after a massage, horses will have the same experience. You often see it when the chiropractor is at work; horses will yawn or chew when an area of tension is released. Being mentally stressed affects performance; yes a certain degree of stress will enhance performance but too much stress will have a negative impact, which means that actually you want to create as positive an environment for a horse as possible so that they are able to perform to their best for you.

All this research made me realise that whilst it’s great for a horse to be physically checked out by chiropractors and there will be massage benefits from this visit, if you have a naturally tense horse or one who does a lot of travelling to competitions then it would be worth investing in regular massages for them, particularly after an important competition, when they may be physically and mentally fatigued. This should leave a horse in better health – less prone to injury or catching diseases. Which means more fun time for you both! A relaxed horse is a happier horse, so they’ll be more willing to work for you and perform better.

I’ve signed Phoenix up to be a case study when I start riding her, and it will be interesting to see the effects of a massage particularly after she’s been to her first off site clinics or competitions. Judging by last weekend her behaviour will be faultless, but she will be mentally fatigued by the experience and multiple new stimuli and as we want her to enjoy getting out and about, ensuring that we “reset” her at home afterwards will mean that she is more likely to enjoy the experiences.


To Boot Or Not To Boot?

Another subject request from a client was on the topic of booting. Should you put boots on or not?

To me, boots have done a bit of a full circle. At least twice. Years ago, nobody would have used any form of leg protection at all. Didn’t Black Beauty scar his knees in a fall? Then bandages were introduced, but they’d only have been used by the elite – they’re tricky to put on correctly and are dangerous if they come undone. Especially on the hunt field or cross country course.

Then the basic brushing boot came onto the market, which soon became popular amongst all as it was affordable and easy to use. These became more elaborate with sheepskin and various fancy fastenings. And we all became a little obsessed with protecting our horses against any knock or cut, and boots were used to turn out competition horses in the field as well as when ridden.

Then along came the scientists, who found that boots heat the leg up, which makes the tendons more liable to injury – Here’s a really interesting article about the pros and cons of boots from a scientific perspective.

So then owners started to move away slightly from boots. But we still have that urge to protect our horse’s legs. Which has left us in a bit of a quandary and susceptible to the marketing ploys of all the scientifically researched boots which require you to take out a second mortgage to purchase them.

I joke, but after perusing the Premier Equine spring catalogue and dreaming of winning the lottery, protective boots have become very complicated areas.

Back to my client’s original question. To boot or not to boot?

I think ultimately it requires you to be sensible. Take precautions, use good quality equipment, but also allow horses to be horses.

Firstly, have a look at your horse’s conformation and way of going. Are they at risk of overreaching because they’re short-coupled? Are they young and unbalanced? Do they move straight, or is there a swing to their limbs? Are they “out of one hole” and narrow chested? All of which increases their risk of inflicting damage upon themselves, by one limb knocking the other. Do they have shoes? A shod foot will do more injury than a barefoot. And studs will do more damage than a plain shoe.

If your horse answers yes to any of the above questions then I’d be more inclined to use protective boots.

Next, what are you doing with your horse? A gentle hack, or prelim/novice level flatwork has a lower risk of injuries than cross country or interval training. The BHS taught me to put brushing boots on to lunge because the risk of injury is higher when the horse is working on a circle. Whether they still advocate this, I’m not sure, but it’s a valid point. Equally. I would consider the horse’s energy levels – is he fresh and likely to throw in a couple of spooks or bucks which may cause injury?

Another point to consider is how hardy is your horse? A thin skinned, clipped Thoroughbred will knock themselves and blood will start gushing, whilst a well feathered cob has more natural protection. Of course there are exceptions to every rule, so get to know your horse.

Does your horse have a previous injury? For example, if they’ve previously done a tendon, or have an old scar on their leg, then you may want to consider booting them for supportive reasons as much as protective reasons.

Otis wore boots as a matter of course. I always put brushing boots on him; simple, basic ones. Mainly because I think I always did, so we were both used to it. Then he frequently pulled shoes off, so he wore overreach boots when ridden and when in a herd, he wore them in the field. On his own, he is fairly sensible about it all. His hind legs are quite close together, and when he was shod behind the inside of his shoe used to catch the inside of the other coronet band, so that he lost his feathers in that area. So I put sausage boots on his back legs, which I’m not one hundred percent convinced that they solved the problem, but they definitely reduced the effect. Upon reflection, I think overreach boots would have been a better alternative.

With Matt, I didn’t put brushing boots on him in everyday riding, and Mum doesn’t either. However, when I took him on some sponsored rides last year I did put brushing boots on him for protection over the solid fences.

With Phoenix I’ve not yet used boots on her. She’s barefoot and straight moving, so I’m not worried too much about overreaching or knocks, especially while she’s in such light work. Plus the fields are so muddy that I would struggle to get her legs clean enough to put boots on, so risking damage to her legs from abrasions due to pieces of grit being caught between the boot and her leg. Once I start jumping her properly I’ll definitely put boots on her, to protect her from knocks as she learns what to do with her body. But I think I may be more relaxed with her than with Otis, and just put boots on when I feel she needs protection. Once she’s learning lateral work then she’ll need protection as she gets used to crossing her legs over.

So to answer my client’s question, I think it’s important to take precaution with our horse’s legs to avoid injury from knocks, abrasions or cuts. But it’s equally important to try to prevent soft tissue injury by fittening your horse sufficiently because the jury is out as to how supportive boots actually are. And don’t feel that you have to use boots all the time: work out when you think your horse will most benefit from them and which types of boots (tendon boots, brushing boots, fetlock boots, etc) will best serve the purpose.

Then of course is the mind boggling question of which boots should you use. After all, they come in all shapes, sizes and materials. Basic boots are usually neoprene, which are lightweight so won’t have too much of a warming effect on the horse’s legs or weigh them down as they move. However, neoprene does soak up water so will become heavy and possibly hinder the horse after the water element on a cross country course.

Some boots have sheepskin inner, which were in fashion twenty years ago, but as the sheepskin warms the limbs up excessively they dropped out of fashion. Plus they’re so difficult to clean! However, sheepskin is better for sensitive skinned horses, and creates more even pressure around the leg so avoids rubs and pressure points. I saw some sheepskin boots in the Premier Equine catalogue which states that the sheepskin uses “airtechnology” to prevent the leg overheating. I’d like to see an independent study on the heat of legs and different materials of boots to see what materials are best.

Then there are more specialist boots, for example for fast work and cross country. These advocate their cooling technology. The ones I saw have vents which allow air to flow under the boot when the horse is moving. Together with technological advances, these boots have become very hard wearing and tough without getting heavy. Heavy boots will impede a horse’s movement and performance.

In all, despite the fact that we now know there are limitations and side effects of using protective boots for horses, technology has allowed boots to be developed which aim to enhance performance, prevent overheating, and provide protection to the limbs. So we shouldn’t be put off from using boots when necessary. However, I think I would choose when I used boots, and only use the level of protection that I required – so if a horse doesn’t need overreach boots then don’t use them, and don’t use specialist cross country boots for flatwork in the school – because the very nature of putting boots into limbs, or bandages for that matter, alters the way a horse uses their body. Then I would also minimise the length of time a horse spent wearing them.

On a side note, have you seen the research done on barefoot (human) runners and the difference in the way the foot absorbs impact when bare as opposed to when wearing trainers? It’s really interesting how the toes spread out and work independently to balance the body when unrestricted.



The Equicore

A friend told me a couple of weeks ago about her new toy – the Equiband. I’d seen them around, but not seen them in use, so when she asked me to lunge her horse with it I jumped at the chance to get some footage for the blog.

The Equiband system is made by Equicore Concepts – Their website is here for some more information about the company. The Equiband system consists of a saddle pad, with two large plastic clips on each side, and two lengths of what can only be described as a fitness elastic band – very similar to the ones we use in Pilates, albeit hopefully much stronger. The saddle pad is a generic one, so has high withers and can be used with all types of saddles, or lunge rollers.

The shorter of the bands, the abdominal band, runs under the horse’s belly (near their belly button) attaching to the saddle cloth via the plastic clips. The purpose of this band is to activate the abdominal muscles. It shouldn’t be tight, in the way that an over tight belt is uncomfortable, but it’s mere presence should encourage the horse to lift their abs. Strengthening, or activating, the abdominals encourages the horse to flex and lift through their back, improving their posture and way of going whilst reducing the risk of injury. This means that the Equiband should greatly help horses with kissing spines and poor posture.

The longer band, hindquarter band, runs from the saddle cloth, from the diagonal clips, around the hindquarters so that it sits above the hock, passing just below the stifle. Immediately I was reminded of the back straps of Pessoas and Equipment-Amis. Again, there is slight pressure but it shouldn’t be uncomfortably tight, which will increase the horse’s awareness off their hindlegs. According to Equiconcept’s website, the hindquarter band improves gait asymmetry, increases engagement of the hindquarters and helps develop the muscle groups of the hindquarters.

To begin our session, once I’d sorted out the different bands, I warmed the horse up in trot on both reins. I’ve videoed each stage on the left rein so that you can compare the changes in his gait and posture.

Next, I attached the abdominal band. Initially I didn’t really see a difference, but then he suddenly started to engage them, dropping his nose as he lifted the withers and back.

After going on both reins, I attached the second band.

Again, initially I didn’t see a huge difference, but after working on both reins and probably ten minutes since attaching the first band, I noticed that this horse (who is quite fit) had all his veins standing out. He was obviously working a lot harder than I gave him credit for. I thought it was interesting to see how much he was stretching in his neck, without any assistance, as a direct result of engaging his hindquarters and abdominals.

I worked this horse lightly in the canter, but unfortunately didn’t get any video footage – story of my life is running out of storage on my phone! However, I did think that there was more impulsion and his inside hind leg seemed to be coming under his body further and he looked lighter in the canter.

Overall, I was surprised at the changes in this horse’s posture with just the slight pressure of the bands. As well as how the horse tired quicker than normal, which shows he was using different muscles. In the instructions it does tell you to reduce your workout duration because the horse will be working harder.

The Equiband can be used in ridden work, so I’d be really interested to see and hear owner’s feedback as to how their horse feels whilst being ridden in the Equiband. Otherwise, it’s definitely a lunging aid that I’d consider for building up a horse’s topline if they have poor posture or been out of work for some time. I think it has to be introduced in such a way that the horse doesn’t panic by the feeling of having the bands around their body and only when they accept the pressure should they be ridden with them.


Matt’s Recovery

Here is the conclusion to Matt’s recovery saga. In my last update, it was the six month mark since fracturing his stifle – Which you can read about here.

December wasn’t an easy month for Matt. In mid December he managed to scratch his eye, developing an ulcer. Unfortunately the ulcer took a long time to heal. I think it was a combination of his age (he’s now classed as a veteran), and the weather – a cold, biting wind irritates the eye. Matt’s had an ulcer in that eye before, and it took a long time to heal then.

Between Christmas and New Year, Mum got one of the girls at the yard to sit on Matt for the first time. Matt was a bit fresh, but not naughty. And hopefully happy to be back in work – although his expression when Mum produced the saddle tells another story.

Unfortunately, after only a couple of rides, Matt decided to have an asthma attack. The symptoms were similar to colic so he had an emergency vet visit and put on a course of ventapulmin, soaked hay, dust free bedding. The vet suggested that Matt has COPD, but as he’s never shown any symptoms of it before I’m hoping that it’s the result of a cumulative effect of being stabled for six months, the fact turnout over Christmas was limited, and through the winter he has been stabled with two neighbours who are also bedded on straw. If Matt’s been in when his neighbours were mucked out then the process of spreading fresh straw would create a dusty environment. Potentially his lack of exercise could also mean that dust and irritants sat in his respiratory system, instead of being shifted regularly when he’s ridden.

Once Matt was back into his turnout routine and things had settled down again, Mum began riding again.

You can see from the photos that Matt is very much out of shape. He’s built up a bit of muscle just being turned out because the large field is on the side of a hill and has plenty of terrain for him to traverse. However, now that Matt is up to hacking for an hour, including some cantering, Mum will begin lunging him in the Pessoa to improve his topline and schooling him. It will take time, after all he’s never had eight months off in his life, but the fracture site is fully healed and in theory stronger than before, so it’s just a matter of fittening and strengthening his whole body.


Lunging Gadgets

I asked a couple of weeks ago for any requests for blog subjects, as I’m trying to write a few in preparation for having my hands full. Plus it’s a useful occupation whilst lying on the sofa and stops me googling too many inane questions about babies.

One request was a continuation of a conversation I’d had with a client about lunging aids. Or gadgets. How do you know which one your horse needs, or doesn’t need. Or if they need any at all.

I think I’ve said before, that whilst I feel lunging aids have a use and can be very beneficial to a horse, they can just as easily cause more harm than good by being adjusted incorrectly or with a poor lunging technique.

Firstly, when deciding on which lunging aid you’re going to try, I think it’s important to reflect on how the horse goes when ridden, and if there’s any issues there which need resolving before you start a lunging program, or indeed if there’s any area under saddle which would benefit from being worked on on the lunge. Then it’s useful to see the horse on the lunge, to make sure they understand the basic concept, and are relaxed and focused on the aids, before adding the complication of a gadget. Thirdly, speak to your instructor about it. They may have more experience of a lunging aid so be able to help you fit it and use it correctly, as well as advise to how often you should use it. Lunging, whilst a useful way to burn some extra calories, should supplement the ridden work. So if your horse will work long and low on their own accord on the lunge, find their balance and self carriage then you don’t need a gadget as such, just some exercises such as spiralling in or pole work to help improve their work under saddle. But for some horses, they need some help to point them in the right direction of self-carriage, balance and working long and low.

Finally, critique your own ability – easier said than done – about lunging. Are you able to influence the way a horse goes through body language? In which case do you actually need any more than a lunge cavesson to improve your horse’s way of going or would some lessons and good old practice suffice?

Lunging aids, such as a bungee or side reins, focus on the front of the horse so I feel that if you decide to go down that route then the lungee needs to be able to efficiently send the horse forwards from behind, and the horse respond appropriately without tensing or rushing, in order to use these gadgets correctly. A Pessoa, or Equi-Ami, or any other whole body gadget, will work on both the front and back ends, which so long as they are fitted correctly, require the lungee to do less technical work. Which may explain their popularity, in that they don’t need quite so much skill in order to see an improvement in your horse.

Here are a couple of examples of horses that I’ve lunged, and which lunging aid I’ve opted to use to help improve their way of going.

Firstly, is a pony who tends to drift through his right shoulder. When ridden straight, he’s fine, it’s just a technique he’s developed to make his life easier. Now in lessons, I’ve spent a lot of time straightening and evening out his riders rein contact (her left hand tends to fix whilst the right hand drifts forward constantly, so enabling the pony to go crooked). It’s a bit of a vicious circle in that neither are truly straight, so to help correct the pony, I suggested he was lunged in side reins. This would give him an even contact in his mouth, help teach him not to fall through the right shoulder, and improve his straightness because he would have to engage his left hindleg under his body. He also likes to tuck behind the bit, so his rider can see for herself how he starts to take the contact forwards when driven on from behind and straight. This will help her understand that she needs to use more leg and seat to push the pony into the contact, whilst stabilising the hands, and she will be able to visualise the results. Lunging in side reins once a week will help break the cycle because the pony will become straighter and then my rider will feel the effects of her wobbly right hand and more easily get the correct result when she corrects herself.

One mare that I lunge tends to get tight in her neck, and lock her back. She looks active enough, but it’s just the legs pedalling as fast as possible whilst the back stays as still as a duck serenely floating along the river. When you ride her she likes a contact, but it mustn’t be restrictive, and you must be riding her quietly from behind so that she goes forwards without getting tense. She’s the classic example of the benefit of riding from the back to the front of the horse, rather than pinning the front end in. Anyway, when using side reins, she stiffens her neck, lifts her head and goes behind the contact. Sending her on, when lunging, just makes her paddle quicker with the legs as she rushes. She needs more encouragement to release over her back and to drop her nose forwards and down. So I put her in the Pessoa. The strap behind her hindquarters sends her on from behind, without the lungee flapping and worrying the mare into tension. It mimics the “riding from the back to the front” adage. The clips to her bit and between her front legs should not be too tight, because she will just tense and contract her neck instead of seeking the contact forwards. These clips will also put pressure on her bit to encourage her to lower her head as that’s where she’ll feel the release of pressure. After lunging her a couple of times like this, she stopped getting tense when the Pessoa was attached, and immediately took herself into a long and low position, swinging nicely over her back. Teaching her to work over her back without the interference of a rider and their balance will pay huge dividends under saddle. After a couple of months lunging like this, I’d expect to see her stretching long and low in her warm up on the lunge, which then means you can lunge naked, which will encourage more self-carriage, or use a different technique or exercise to help strengthen another area of her body.

Another horse I’ve been working on is quite short coupled and easily over tracks. In fact, in walk his hind feet over step his the prints left by his forefeet by an easy two lengths. Under saddle, the horse can throw himself out through the outside shoulder to evade bending through his rib cage. He can get a bit tight under the saddle and at the base of the neck, so would benefit from stretching on the lunge. However, because he’s at risk of over reaching due to his conformation I think the Pessoa will hurry his hindquarters too much. No you don’t want to ride from hand to leg, but I think the lungee can influence the hindquarters sufficiently with this horse that his engine will work without the pressure of the back strap. I decided to use side reins, on a fairly long setting so that the horse is encouraged to lengthen his neck as he seeks the contact. The side reins also help prevent the horse evading through his shoulders. Then whilst lunging him I can work on sending him forwards so he works with the right amount of impulsion and then he will seek the contact of the side reins for himself and develop self carriage.

Another horse I teach with lacks impulsion and can be very lazy with her hindquarters. Whilst she uses crookedness to evade her rider’s aids, I feel that the first port of call with her on the lunge is to activate her hindquarters. In order that she doesn’t rush and shuffle off, but instead lengthens the stride and pushes with the hindlegs, the lungee needs to be able to maintain some tension down the lunge line whilst also using their body and the lunge whip to drive the mare forwards. This takes a bit of skill, so her owners actually need the help of a well fitting gadget around her hindquarters to support them in sending her forwards. For this reason I suggested they tried using the Pessoa. Perhaps once they’ve developed their skill and become more adept with the lunge line and whip, and the mare is more forwards, they could move on to the side reins to assist with the straightness and help establish the outside rein contact.

You may have noticed that I only really use the side reins or a Pessoa. I’ve experienced other gadgets, especially when lunging a horse in rehab for their owners but I’m not fully familiar with them or completely satisfied with the hows and why’s they work, so prefer to use a tool that I’m confident with, and then if it’s not having the effect I imagined it to, I’ll do more research into other options. Something about not being a jack of all trades and master of none!

When going down the route of lunging to improve your horse’s way of going I always advocate having a couple of lessons, to improve your technique, and to ensure the lunging aid is fitted correctly and is benefiting your horse, and what exercises you can do on the lunge. And if your instructor doesn’t know how the gadget you want to try works, then see if another instructor in your area does who can offer advice. Perhaps this is a gap in the market? To offer lunge clinics, which teach owners the correct basic technique, and also demonstrate the correct use and fitting of such lunging aids.