Riding Away

I’ve done a few lessons recently where I’ve been focusing on how my riders finish their school movements and ride away from a fence. The way you ride out of a circle sets you up for the next movement in your dressage test, and how you ride away from a jump affects your approach to the next fence.

With one rider, I worked on her landing, how she rode away from each fence and the speed in which she recovered: rebalancing the canter, checking she’s on the necessary canter lead and riding the turn after the jump. The quicker she can recover from a jump, the more time she’ll have to set up for the next fence. In jump of scenarios, a quicker recovery could mean that you can ride a tighter turn and shave precious seconds of your time. I used a very twisty course with lots of short approaches and getaways from fences to help my rider become more aware of the knock on effect of not preparing her getaway, or waiting until she’s landed and cantered a stride before thinking about her next jump.

On the dressage side of things, it is important to think about how you ride out of a school movement as finishing in a rushed, tense mess means that you will start your next movement in a rushed, tense mess, so you cannot execute that movement to the best of your ability.

The levels of dressage test takes recovery and preparation for each movement into account: at prelim level each movement is separated by some simple travelling around the arena. These filler movements allow you to rebalance yourself and your horse after a botched circle or transition so that you can do your best on the next movement. At elementary level, transitions, circles and school movements come up much quicker, meaning the rider has to plan how they finish a movement so that they are quickly set up for the next movement.

A very useful exercise for highlighting the importance of riding out of a movement is one of my favourite sequences to ride and teach with at the moment.

On the left rein, ride leg yield left from the letter F towards the centre line. After the EB line, halt and ride a turn on the forehand in a clockwise direction. Proceed in walk, leg yielding left back to the track. It seems pretty straightforward, but it’s important to break down the sequence even more. After the first leg yield, you need to ride a few strides in a straight line before halting. This is so that the horse halts in a balanced way, with their weight evenly distributed so that they can easily execute the turn on the forehand and don’t lurch sideways falling through their shoulder. It’s also important to halt, and have that moment of immobility, before asking your horse to turn on the forehand. Otherwise they will begin to fuss in a normal halt, anticipating a turn. This causes no end of problems down the centre line in your dressage tests!

After the turn on the forehand, pause. Again to let your horse process what they’ve just done and to rebalance themselves into a halt. Now, you should get a balanced, active transition to walk, and after a couple of straight strides, you can begin leg yielding back to the track. The straight strides ensure your horse is most able to moves sideways by using the inside hindleg to push across, rather than pulling across with the outside shoulder. On reaching the track, you right straight again, with their weight evenly over each side of their body. Then you can move up into trot or canter, and really feel the benefit of the lateral sequence you’ve just done.

Can you see how important those little breaks between each movement are? Each horse, depending on their level of training will need different lengths of time between each movement. An established schoolmaster will be able to go from leg yield to halt with only a stride of straight. A green horse, may need four strides to rebalance themselves after the leg yield. In training, it is better to give an extra stride, or second in the halt, before asking for the next movement so that your horse is more likely to do it correctly and to the best of their ability.

Next time you ride, have a think about how you’re coming out of a jump, or school movement, and see if it can be improved so that the trot you exited the circle with us as rhythmical and balanced as the trot you entered it. Then you can begin to think about how quickly you are ready to do another school movement. Could you do something at the next dressage letter, for example? When jumping, think about could you have ridden that turn between two fences if there was one less canter stride until the second – so a relates distance of four strides instead of five?

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