High Winds

There’s so many topical subjects to blog about this weekend. But I’m going to steer clear of the can of worms which is equine ‘flu, and instead talk about the high winds which have been forecast for this weekend.

There was a lot of talk on an instructors forum earlier in the week about risk assessments and teaching in stormy weather. Regardless of whether you are a teacher, horse owner, or riding school client, there are things you should be aware of in windy weather.

Firstly, consider if it is actually safe to ride on a windy day. I’m a big believer in not being a fair weather rider, and getting horses used to all sorts of weather. But you have to stay safe. So it might be that you lunge instead of ride, or flat instead of jump. Or school instead of hacking. Or just do some pony pampering and ride tomorrow instead!

With my instructor hat on, I need to make sure the arena is safe. An indoor is great, but you do need to be aware of tree branches banging on the roof in stormy weather. In an outdoor arena, you want to be aware of external threats. It may be the plastic covering on the stack of hay bales near the arena is billowing around, or nearby trees are dropping branches. If the arena is big enough, you may decide to work at one end to reduce the hazards.

As much as you can, try and make the area safe. Put away jump stands so they don’t blow over in a sudden gust and spook the horse. Remove any flapping objects or weigh them down.

If you have to travel your horse to a venue, such as a clinic or competition, then you need to consider whether it’s safe to do so. Are the roads likely to be blocked by fallen trees, or flooded? Is your horse a good traveller, and are you confident towing a trailer or driving a lorry in windy weather? If you aren’t happy, then you are better off rearranging or cancelling your plans.

Each horse is individual, and every rider is individual, so as an instructor I need to talk to the rider. If the horse is young or of a spooky nature, I’d probably advise changing the lesson plan to potentially lunging or in hand work to be safe. If the rider is a novice, or nervous and I don’t think they will benefit from a lesson in the wind then I will chat to them too.

This is where riding school clients need to take note. If your lesson, on your own horse or otherwise still takes place on a windy day, then you need to be prepared, and accept a change to your lesson structure. It may be that you don’t ride your favourite horse because they are unpredictable in the wind. Or it may be that you have a lesson instead of a hack because it’s safer. If you were supposed to have a jump lesson, you may be end up doing pole work or flat work because there’s a risk the jumps may blow over. If you were hoping (yes, some riders like doing it) for a non stirrup lesson you may be working on other areas because it’s safer for you to keep your stirrups as there’s an increased chance of your horse spooking in the wind. Your instructor will do what they feel is best to keep you both safe.

Really, stormy weather doesn’t need a big panic, you just need to be careful and assess the weather forecast (it might be better to rearrange your ride from the morning to the afternoon when it’s calmer), adjust your riding plans to get the best out of you and your horse, and most importantly to stay safe. And if you really aren’t sure, chat to your instructor, even if you aren’t booked in for a lesson that day, to see what they advise as they know the pair of you and your capabilities well.

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