Jumping Manners

Last week I jumped a horse for a client. He’s new to her, and as she hasn’t jumped for a long time, I was given the job of putting him through his paces.

This horse is a keen and experienced jumper, but he can be a bit bargy on the ground so I wanted to establish the rules whilst jumping so that his rider would be confident and in control when she begins jumping.

I constructed a grid of three jumps, with one canter stride between. Starting with poles on the ground, I used these as part of my warm up. I trotted over them in both directions. Predictably, he rushed and tried to canter through the grid. So I made him halt. And then walk the rest of the grid. After doing this a couple of times he trotted sweetly over the grid in a lovely balanced rhythm.

I feel this is important as a rider lacking confidence when jumping needs to be able choose the pace they approach in. They may choose to trot into a cross pole for the first couple of times, then progress to cantering over it. When the jump becomes bigger, or an upright, they may decide to trot into it the first time. To help give the rider confidence, they need to know they will approach the jump at their chosen pace.

After I’d trotted the poles in both directions, with the horse staying steady and rhythmical throughout, I did the same in canter. When a grid is set up, the distances between poles on the ground is often awkward for horses. Because they don’t have the jumps the distance between the poles is about one and a half canter strides instead of one. If you think about the way a horse jumps they take off and land further away from a jump than they would over a pole on the ground. So you either have to extend the canter to get one long stride, or collect it to get two strides between the poles. Keeping with the plan of improving control, and not letting the horse rush the jumps, I collected the canter for two strides, to which he obliged.

Next, I put up the third jump to a little cross and we trotted the grid a couple of times, until I felt the horse settle at my chosen tempo. Then we cantered it, getting two canter strides between the first and second pole. The more jumps we did, the less the horse tried to rush, and the more easily I could dictate our approach.

I built the grid up to three crosses, alternating our approach from both reins and in trot or canter to ensure that the horse stayed with me and didn’t take over on the approach. He still tried to take over half a dozen strides away from the first jump, but a little half halt on my part and he listened to me. A couple of strides before the jump, I allowed him to take over so that he met the fence at a good take off point. After all, I didn’t want to put him off jumping!

Over the next few weeks, I plan to do more pole work and grids, keeping the focus on maintaining the rhythm, improving his suppleness and balance. And teaching him to be polite and wait for his rider to choose the approach. He’s a keen jumper, so he will give his rider a lot of confidence when they start jumping, so long as she feels in control throughout. I think we’ll have lots of fun getting these two off the ground!

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