What’s What?

We all know that an instructor teaches, but have you ever thought of why they charge what they do, and the other hats that they wear?

Firstly, let’s look at the behind the scenes costs an instructor has.

Arena hire – if you go to their yard they need to include wear and tear, and maintenance costs for their arena. Some instructors have a separate fee for arena hire, as this can vary depending on the facilities hired or the number of riders using the facilities.

Petrol costs – if they come out to your yard, you may be saving on arena hire, but it’s amazing how quickly the mileage clocks up when you visit several yards. On your accounts you can claim £0.45 per mile, so if you imagine an instructor has travelled 10 miles to your lesson that costs them £9 in motor costs, because of course they have two journeys. Some instructors have an area or radius of X miles and if they have to travel beyond that they charge petrol money. Other instructors work in different areas on different days of the week, or try and book their work into the most economical blocks, saving on both travel time and travel costs.

Insurance – all instructors should be insured, whether it’s for teaching, or riding, or both. Even if you have your own insurance as a horse owner, as soon as you pay someone to teach you or ride your horse that insurance becomes invalid. Instructor insurance covers the instructor for any accident that happens to them whilst working, any injury to you or your horse under their supervision, and any damage to a third party or property whilst they are riding or teaching. As well as paying a monthly insurance premium, there are also compulsory courses for instructors to attend, such as annual CPD training days, first aid courses, DBS and safeguarding certificates. Of which all adds up.

PPE- horse riding equipment is expensive, as we all know, and being a self employed instructor you have to provide your own PPE, as well as suitable clothes to work in. This can become very expensive, so it’s no wonder so many equestrian professionals wait until there are holes in their boots before replacing them.

Of course there is then time spent, unpaid, preparing for lessons. For many regular clients, it may be thinking of an appropriate exercise from your repertoire, but often you have to spend a bit of time researching new exercises or planning your delivery of a new concept. But you may be investigating alternative tack or preparing a stable management lecture.

I think that pretty much sums up the hidden costs of an equitation instructor. But what about the various hats they don? How do they help you out of the saddle?

Firstly, an instructor is very often your first port of call to discuss anything and everything equine. I spend a surprising amount of time talking to clients, both during lessons, or over text, about things that are not related to their lessons at all.

I’m often asked about feeding. Is the feed the correct energy level for their horse. Should they have hay or haylage? Have I any experience of various supplements and which does their horse need? Has their horse gained weight?

I also get asked about field management; whether the horse should start living in at night, if they should come in during the day out of the sun, how to divide and rest their paddock. What bedding should they use, how to provide water so that their horse can’t tip it over.

Clients also ask me about tack. Does it look like it fits, would a different bit be better, is this the right style girth to buy. Then I’ll also be asked what type of clip they need, if they’ve got the right weight rug on, or do they need a fly rug.

Often I also find I am someone to tell about their week’s riding. Their horse’s behaviour on a hack, or their amazing schooling session, or the fun they had competing. Or perhaps they want to analyse a new behaviour they’ve come across in their horse and see if I can suggest a cause.

Then of course, we talk about the upcoming week. Queries about loading, what to work on before their competition, how to manage or balance their horse’s workload.

I guess you could say that whilst an instructor is primarily employed to educate horse and rider in equitation, they are also a bit of a life coach and agony aunt. Clients go to them for advice about everything equine, and it is the instructors duty to advise where they can, listen when needed, but also to be able to direct the owner to someone who specialises in their problem area. For example, I may be able to tell them that the saddle needs adjusting, and help them find a temporary solution to keep the horse comfortable, but the client needs to book a saddler to fit the saddle long term, and I often need to be able to suggest a couple of suitable professionals for them to contact.

You want to feel that you can contact your instructor “out of hours” so to speak. No, that does not mean late at night! It means you can speak to them outside of lesson times and they will help or support you. For example, I love getting texts from my clients who have been competing, telling me how they’ve got on and sending videos. I also regularly get texts from them telling me how fabulous their schooling session was, or thanking me for giving them the confidence to try new things. Or just telling me how much they appreciate and love their horse!

So yes, there are many hats that an instructor needs to be able to wear, and a plethora of information that they need to have at their fingertips. Remember that as they’re worth their weight in gold, and are most definitely working hard to earn that lesson fee, in ways which aren’t always immediately obvious. Value them!

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