Circles Within A Grid

Sometimes horses can lock on to fences quite strongly, and not always at the rider’s choice. Many times I remember coming round a corner on the showjumping course and Otis locking onto the wrong fence and we had to have serious words to take his eye off that one and to focus on the correct jump. Additionally, horses can get a bit fast and flat through a course.

To improve a horse’s responsiveness to the aids while jumping, to stop them rushing and flattening their canter through combinations, and to improve their bascule by encouraging them to sit on their hocks with a more collected and round canter, I built this grid earlier this week.

The grid was positioned on the three quarter line, and consisted of three cross poles, two canter strides apart. The jumps don’t want to be particularly large.

Once my horse and rider had cantered over the poles on the floor and the crosses on each rein, we started to get a bit more technical. The horse was getting a bit fast and flat as they travelled through the grid. Not unrideable, but her technique over the jumps had deteriorated by the third cross pole.

I asked my rider to jump fences one and two, then ride a circle to approach fence two again, before jumping the third fence. I left the size of the circle up to them, but they were limited to a maximum of 15m due to the size of the arena. The first time, my rider really had to pull her horse out of the grid and onto the circle. By the second half of the circle the canter had returned to its usual balanced self, and the second time over the second fence was much neater and less rushed.

We repeated this a couple of times in both directions so that the circle was round, fluid, and the canter consistent. Initially, my rider was landing then riding onto the circle, but by getting her to prepare whilst in the air, her horse expected a turn on landing so reacted quicker to her aids. I explained to her that landing and changing their direction of course felt to the horse like a change of mind, which can knock their confidence if they think the rider doesn’t want to jump and possibly lead to run outs. If my rider jumps the second fence the first time planning to turn away onto the circle then she’s already set their course, and if the horse doesn’t react or resists then the horse is in the wrong, and learns that they need to listen to the rider continuously. This makes the grid less confusing to the horse – the rider has set the course from the beginning and there are no moments when the horse can interpret a change of mind from the rider.

The next step, was to ride a circle after each jump, which meant that each fence was jumped twice. The first time, the pair had a little argument for the first circle, but as my rider was riding for the circle earlier, it was a smaller period of resistance and she managed to rebalance her canter quickly. The canter stayed much more rhythmical throughout the grid, and the mare made a cleaner shape over each fence.

We repeated this on both reins, to work the canters evenly, and then I got them to just ride straight through the grid. Whereas before we’d used this exercise, the horse was making the distance between the second and third fence look small (due to her flatter, longer striding canter), this time the distances looked the same as the canter stayed consistent.

I next raised all the fences to 90cm uprights, and had them jump through the grid on both reins. Their bascules were neater, and the grid didn’t feel as rushed.

I’d like to do this exercise, or a similar one, in the near future with this pair, but focusing more on improving the canter and riding smaller circles to bring the hocks underneath her, which will help them ping over the larger fences.

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