Calmer Bites

A few weeks ago I had a slightly psychotic Phoenix on my hands. I think it was the transition from living out 24/7 to living in at night, combined with her getting fitter. I couldn’t fault her behaviour on the ground, or out hacking, or even in the school. She wasn’t spooky or naughty, just hot – like she was on a constant adrenaline high. A good, long workout didn’t take the edge off, so I knew it wasn’t an excess of energy. But she definitely wasn’t her usual self. I did wonder if she was stressed, but channeling it internally, so it came out as anxiety as opposed to bad behaviour.

I thought about calmers, but I wasn’t convinced they were the answer because her behaviour hadn’t changed, or at least she hadn’t become spooky. But I did wonder if she had a bit of a chemical imbalance, akin to people suffering from bipolar disorder. This would explain the uptightness and that a long workout didn’t tire her out.

I couldn’t see what stress factors she had as we’d not competed recently, her diet hadn’t changed and was low in sugars, and she’d seemingly settled into the yard and field happily, which made me wonder if she’d been stressed (perhaps the first week of living in) and the chemical levels in her brain had become a bit stuck at the incorrect levels. I’m sure a psychologist could explain this far better than me, but in layman’s terms that’s what I felt was going on.

I did some more research, and a friend told me about calmer bites. They seem to be a relatively new thing on the market, but basically they contain L-Tryosine which triggers the production of serotonin, which helps stabilise moods. They say it “takes the edge off” a horse’s excitability, which is what I felt Phoenix needed.

I think the instant calmer syringes work in a similar way, but as Phoenix is not the easiest horse to worm, I thought a bite size treat would be more effective – at least she’d ingest more of it! 45-60 minutes after administration, the seratonin levels should increase, and the horse becomes calmer. The effects last for three or four hours and you can “load” a horse with several cookies over a couple of days.

Calmer bites are commonly used the day before a competition and on the morning of to help calm a horse. Or for travelling or clipping. They don’t contain any FEI banned substances so are legal for competition use.

Now, I didn’t particularly want to end up relying on calmers or anything, but I did think that the calmer bites could help reset Phoenix. I tend to think that if a horse is stressed and needs “calming” there is a problem somewhere in their management, diet or training, so by feeding calmers you are not addressing the cause, merely masking it. However, if it would get Phoenix back on track I thought it was worth a shot.

It was a bit of a gamble, as there have been mixed reviews on the calming cookies products (as with any calmer but I think that’s down to the cause as much as anything) but I fed Phoenix a calmer bite twice a day for three days as a loading dose, and definitely found that she was calmer. Probably a better explanation is that she wasn’t on high alert and over reactive to my leg aids, or as anticipative to canter and repeat canters during a schooling session, which made her much more rideable. As she had maintained her perfect manners out hacking and on the ground, I couldn’t say that they had had a positive impact, but I definitely liked her more relaxed attitude towards schooling.

Phoenix had the calmer bites for three days and since then she seems to have remained more level headed, so I think that they will have helped normalise her seratonin levels, which had dropped for whatever reason. The most likely cause I can think of is the transition from her summer routine to her winter routine. Which she seems to have accepted now, as she’s not pulling her rugs onto the floor, tossing hay from her haybar, or spilling her water in the mornings as she waits to be turned out. It will be interesting to see how she transitions next year.

For now though, I’ll keep the rest of the calmer bites and try using them when she’s next clipped to see if it keep her more relaxed, acting as a mild sedative so that she is more accepting of the clipping process.

I would say that calmer bites are not the answer to a horse being stressed, but they could be used as an aid to training. For example, if a horse has had a bad experience travelling then they may be useful the next time they travel to help give them a good experience and overcome their fears. But a horse will only truly overcome their fears by their carer taking the steps to build their confidence during transportation.

The calmer bites I used for Phoenix are made by Equine Science, and can be found on their website.

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